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Catherines Chat

Wholistic Financial Solutions provides a lot of essential information and updates regarding the property investment industry. Check this page for the updates.

WFS In the News

Wednesday, February 03, 2016

Catherine Smith from Wholistic Financial Solutions comments on the Canberra Property Market


https://www.mywealth.commbank.com.au/property/canberra-suburbs-to-watch--infocus201601


The Future Remains Bright for Mackay, Gladstone and Townsville

Friday, September 13, 2013

There are currently many investors who purchased in regional areas of QLD and have been disappointed by having to accept lower than anticipated rental returns. Negative media about the end of the resources boom have also left these investors thinking that they have made a bad investment choice. However now is not the time to panic.

When you dig deeper into what is actually happening in these regions and look at the longer term the future prospects for cities like Gladstone, Mackay, Emerald, Rockhampton and Townsville remain incredibly strong. We may have passed the peak of the investment stage but we are yet to begin receiving the billions of dollars of income once exporting begins. And we still have some massive projects due to commence that will employ thousands of workers.

Please see the following link to an article from Terry Ryder suggesting that bright days are ahead;

http://m.propertyobserver.com.au/residential/rocky-on-the-rise-as-gladstone-stumbles-terry-ryder-hotspotting-rockhampton-gladstone/2013052261590

The short term over supply of rental properties in Gladstone and Mackay should be absorbed by early next year. It may take awhile for rents to get back to their peak levels but the potential for above average capital growth remains very strong. The Gladstone metropolitan area is fast running out of land that can be developed at an affordable price. Most future development will be around 20 minutes away in Boyne Island/ Tannum Sands or Calliope. While there is more land around Mackay capable of being developed you are no doubt aware of how long it takes for the Mackay council and local developers to bring the land to market. And most land left is either low lying or very hilly, meaning the cost to deliver lots is higher.

We are very confident is the medium to long term prospects for these regions an hope that investors can be patient. If they hang on happy days are ahead.

 

By: Chris Halpin

Real Estate Market at Start of a New Growth Cycle

Friday, July 05, 2013

Estate agent John McGrath says Sydney’s recovery is well underway, with increasing buyer demand and strong prices being achieved across all property types under $2 million.

He has noted weekend clearance rates have been consistently above 70% for several months and that home loan applications are rising.

"Official interest rates are at a record low, with fantastic deals such as a three-year fixed home loans now on offer at 4.83%," he told his Switzer blog readers.

"We’re on track to achieve 5-10% growth in prices this year, with more buyers coming off the sidelines as they see more and more evidence of stronger sales in their neighbourhoods," he said.

McGrath reckons investors are very prominent in the market.

"Many are choosing to purchase through their self-managed super funds, which continues to be one of the most significant changes in the Australian residential marketplace today."

"We are at the start of a new growth cycle which will play out over the next three to five years."

 

By Jonathan Chancellor
Thursday, 04 July 2013

Record Population Growth Forecasts

Friday, June 28, 2013

At the same time that building starts were dropping Australia’s population was growing at the fastest rate in 200 yrs*. In fact, our population is predicted to grow by 350,000 people per annum*.

(* Australian Bureau of Statistics)        

Australia is predicted to grow at a rate of 65% well above the global average, a survey by the Washington based private research body, the Population Reference Bureau. 

This puts Australia’s growth rate at second only to India.  

Why is this?

1. Migration:

I am no economic expert but many I have talked to have commented that the GFC has rapidly escalated the number of people wanting to migrate to Australia.  The old adage of Australia being the ‘lucky country’ has become a ‘world wide’ slogan.  Australia was one of the only countries to escape a recessions.  Actually, oops I think Prime Minister Rudd announced a recession for only a few days.  During the GFC that crippled many countries, Australia continued to grow at a rapid rate.  In addition, a factor that strikes at the heart of many Australians is that Australia is coined to become ‘the resource hub’ of the new world.  Australia’s natural resources are in ample supply and whether we like it or not, we are a target for a continued resource boom. 

The final verse of Australia’s Anthem makes it clear that migration is a fundamental part of Australia’s mindset.

For those who’ve come across the seas
We’ve boundless plains to share;
With courage let us all combine
To Advance Australia Fair.

(Advance Australia Fair)

2. Increasing birth rate:

Australia’s birth rate is on the increase for the first time since the post-war migration baby boom saw it explode in the 50’ and 60’s. 

According to (Reuters – Aug 6, 2010 (Canberra)) - Australia's birth rate has hit a 25-year high, and government has urged "have one for mum, one for dad, and one for the country".

And further increases in the birth rate could worsen the problems of an ageing population, driving new mothers out of the workforce and reducing the tax base, the nation's productivity watchdog said.

"Much of the recent increase in the fertility rate is likely to reflect the fact that over the last few decades, younger women postponed childbearing and many are now having those postponed babies," Productivity Commission author Ralph Lattimore said.

Australia's 21 million population was boosted by 285,000 births in 2007, the highest level in 25 years, and up from 261,400 births in 2005.

The population is expected to hit 31.6 million by 2050, driven to a small extent by the higher birthrate and almost 10 million new immigrants.

3. Increasing health and longevity:

Australia is well known for it’s healthy and active lifestyle, clean living and fresh, open air spaces.  Coupled with our reasonably good health system and we have Australian’s living longer. 

According to www.aag.asn.au/filelib/Economic_implications_of_increasing_longevity

Look Beyond Population Growth to Supply Side Criteria

Friday, May 24, 2013

Some advisers recommend the PIE buying formula – P.I.E. being Population growth, Infrastructure and investment, and Employment opportunity and diversity.  

The theory is that a location with those three elements at work will deliver real estate growth. As a method of reducing principles down to a digestible and easily-understood formula, it’s a reasonable approach.  

But some base their investment strategies on the P only. They believe that following population growth is the key to successful property buying. That is not only simplistic, it’s dangerous.  

I often receive emails from investors questioning why certain high population growth areas don’t feature is my hotspotting reports. They’re bemused because someone has advised them to buy in the population boom locations.  

They're making the mistake of looking at only one side of the equation - demand. The other side of that equation is supply - and that's where the problem lies.  

Developers invade the high-population-growth places - and often build too much new product. No matter how high the population growth rate, it won’t create capital growth if developers generate an over-supply.

That’s why many of Australia’s leading population growth areas have some of the worst-performing property markets. You could almost argue that rampant growth in resident numbers is a signal for property buyers to stay away.

The Gold Coast is the most obvious example. It has been a national leader on population growth for 20 or more years, but is a habitual under-achiever on capital growth thanks to over-building by developers. It is currently showing glimmers of recovery, after five dreadful years, but I would hesitate to recommend it to investors because we can be confident developers will do it all over again, as they have many times in the past.  

Five years ago I was interested in the Wyndham and Melton municipalities in Melbourne, because they had many of the growth-generating factors I look for in a hotspot. After initially delivering good real estate performance, they declined as developers moved in and over-supplied those markets with house-and-land packages.  

Today, both those locations have poor capital growth rates, well below city averages. Over-building has meant vacancy rates have been 6% or 7% or higher for much of the past three years (although more recently vacancies have come down to more acceptable levels in both Melton and Wyndham).  

The same syndrome is now impacting a couple of Queensland’s boom cities. Both Gladstone and Mackay have sharply rising vacancies, despite their myriad growth factors, because developers have overshot again.  

Both places have strong futures, thanks to their links to the resources sector and their expanding export facilities, but right now investors need to be cautious and selective.  

The overall message for investors is that they need to look beyond population growth and ask deeper questions – including questions about vacancy factors and the amount of new housing supply in planning.

 

Author: Terry Ryder  

Latest Statics Show Huge Undersupply of Housing

Friday, May 10, 2013

Latest statistics (2010) show that there is a housing shortfall of around 32% across the nation. Developers simply cannot keep up with the demand.  Why is this?

For a long time Australia has had a housing shortfall.  Put very simply we don’t have enough developers building houses to keep up with the number of Australians wanting housing.  However, the chronic shortfall we are now seeing has been greatly exacerbated by the Global Financial Crises (GFC).  The GFC saw finance approvals plummet.  Finance became very hard to get.  Finance Approval rejection rates went up by 30% and the hoops that lenders were making finance applicants jump through simply made the finance process untenable.  Many developers simply could not get finance to commence their projects so they stopped building.  And this was at a time when our population was growing at an extremely high rate.  So dropping building starts and a growing population has created a huge undersupply of housing which is only predicted to get worse.


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